Shooting the Last Frontier with Vinit Mode and Two Tamron Lenses

Two Tamron lenses accompanied Vinit on his trip to the Last Frontier: the Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 VC and the SP 150-600mm VC G2. “I definitely wanted to have the 150-600 with me for taking pictures of wildlife,” he says. “And I found it useful for other logistical reasons. For example, when you’re in Denali National Park, you can’t take your private vehicle into much of it, so we were on a bus. Shooting through bus glass can be tricky, but my handheld pictures of the snowcapped mountains through the windows came out amazing.”

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October 7th – Scott Kelby Worldwide Photowalk

Join us for our Scott Kelby Worldwide Photowalk on October 7th at 9:30.

You can register for the photowalk here.


Our group will gather at Bergen County Camera before we head out on our walk.  Abby Passman, from BCC, and Jared Powers, from Canon USA, will lead the walk. We will explore downtown Westwood with it’s shops and window displays as we make our way down to Veteran’s Park.  Here we will take some time to photograph the beautiful park setting with a grand bandstand, old tree with carvings and many other treasures to discover. The group will then head back to Bergen County Camera for lunch and a photo contest.  Canon USA will provide lunch for all attendees while we print out a 5×7 print of your favorite shot.  The prints will then be judged by Jared and one person from BCC.  We will award some great prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place! The prints will remain on display at Bergen County Camera through the following week.  Come join a great group of photo enthusiasts and pick up some new tips to enhance your photography!

Some info on Jared Powers from Canon

“Jared gained a solid background in documentary photography while in Melbourne, Australia before going on to photographmusicians around the globe. Before moving to New York, he was the Chief Photographer for a major cruise line handling Pacific and Caribbean routes. Upon landing in the Big Apple, he began managing photographic retail operations and training photographers for high profile clients, such as the NY Yankees, NY Mets or the U.S. Open venues to name a few. When not out training on new Canon products, you can find him behind the lens most likely in some hidden corner of a city, deserted road or forest.”

Lakota Wolf Preserve Trip : October 8th

Out most popular trip is coming around again.

Join Bergen County Camera and Tamron on October 8th, 2017 as we return to the Lakota Wolf Preserve.

At Lakota Wolf Preserve, you will be greeted with numerous opportunities to get unobstructed pictures of the wolves in their natural settings. Since you will be photographing the wolves where they live, in a stress free environment, you will get the best possible photo opportunities. Come as close as 3-4 feet to the wolves during our private photography session.  We will end our morning at the Brook Hollow Winery for a wrap up session and complimentary wine tasting.

There will be a pre-trip evening lecture on Wildlife Photography at Lakota Wolf in our Westwood store, on October 5th 2017 from 7-8pm. The lecture will cover the layout and rules of Lakota, what to expect, what lenses are best suited, and how to get that great shot! The lecture will be presented by Tamron.

 

This trip is limited to 30 people so be sure to reserve early.

Tickets can be purchased below.

 

Eventbrite - Bergen County Camera Trips and Meetups 2017

Meet the New Nikon D850!

Meet the D850 in person Wednesday, August 30
from 2:30pm – 4:30pm

The Nikon D850, coming soon.

Call our store to pre-order yours today.

201-664-4113

Today Nikon proudly introduces D850, an FX-format (full frame) DSLR unlike any before it. Combining extreme resolution with fast shooting speeds, outstanding dynamic range and one of the most exciting feature sets of any camera, D850 opens thrilling new possibilities for creators of all levels

Key Features

  • Higher Resolution
    • New Nikon-designed 45.7MP back-side illuminated (BSI) full frame image sensor with no optical low-pass filter
  • Faster Speed
    • Up to 9 FPS continuous shooting with full AF performance
      *Using the MB-D18 Multi Power Battery Pack and EN-EL18a/b
  • Flagship Autofocus
    • 153-point AF system with 99 cross-type sensors works down to -4 EV
  • Multimedia Powerhouse
    • 4K UHD full-frame video, 8K time-lapse, 120p slow-motion, touch focus

Photographing National Parks After Dark with Ken Hubbard

Ken Hubbard, an avid Tamron shooter, shares some of his tips for photographing the night sky in our National Parks.

Pack wide-angle lenses.
This is a no-brainer, since you want to get as much of that jaw-dropping night sky as possible in your photos. The lenses I typically use: the Tamron SP 24-70mm VC G2, the SP 15-30mm VC, and the SP 35mm F/1.8 VC. That prime lens is especially useful because of its fast F/1.8 aperture—it’s desirable to use fast apertures for night sky photos, as you want to reduce the amount of time your shutter is open to reduce star movement. With a 1.8 lens, I can shoot a 10-second exposure instead of 20 or 30 seconds.

There’s a magic number for any focal length you may be using and how long your shutter can stay open before you start getting those streaks in the stars. Although there are some complicated equations, let’s keep it simple. A basic guideline to get you started is the 500 rule: Divide the focal length you’re shooting at into 500; that resulting number will give you the number of seconds your shutter can stay open before you start seeing star movement. So if I’m shooting at 15mm, I can keep my shutter open for roughly 33 seconds. If you see movement in your stars, shorten your exposure.

Determine the optimal time to head out.
Our group tries to venture out during the blue hour, an hour or two after sunset, when there’s still some ambient light to create that beautiful indigo color. You can see an example of that in one of my Sedona photos shown here, where the featured rock formation was also lit up by the quarter-moon that had already risen.

© Ken Hubbard

If you’re going to try for a money shot like the Milky Way, you’ll want to check apps like Sky Guide or PhotoPills to see where and when it will be rising. You don’t want to head out somewhere with a group of people and discover there’s no Milky Way overhead. Capturing it when the skies are darkest—typically between midnight and 2 a.m., depending on the time of year— is ideal. Between April and September provide your best looks: During other parts of the year, the Milky Way either never makes it above the horizon, or it’s too close to sunrise or sunset and will be completely washed out. You’ll barely see it, if at all.

© Ken Hubbard

Research the park you’re going to.
I often start this process months ahead of time, so I’ll know the best times of year to visit, depending on what I’m planning on taking pictures of. Our group will also head out at least a day before a workshop, so we can scout the landscape to make sure it’s everything we were anticipating. You also want to get the lay of the land during the day so when it’s dark you’re not stumbling around with no sense of place.

It also helps to know which parks are rife with light pollution and which aren’t. You can check the International Dark-Sky Association website to see which communities have pledged to preserve the night sky by keeping lighting to a minimum. As far as the national park areas I’ve visited, Sedona is a designated dark-sky community; Zion isn’t too bad, either, and Acadia in Maine is pretty dark, as there aren’t too many towns around throwing off a lot of light. If you do have a park that’s lit up from afar, you can use that light to your advantage (or at least mask it) by using some creative techniques. More on that a little later!

Bring the basics …
A couple of things you’ll definitely need: a tripod, as you’re going to be taking very long exposures (20 or 30 seconds long in some cases). And you’ll want to bring a shutter release cable or some sort of shutter remote. You don’t want to be hand-firing the camera and risk losing images that way.

… and also a flashlight.
One, to see where you’re going, and second for light painting. That’s a terrific way to accentuate your images, like I did in my photo of Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park. One tip I have for this type of creative endeavor: Don’t simply throw the light from behind your camera—your subject will tend to look flat. Because I’m usually taking 20- or 30-second-long exposures in these cases, what I’ll do is hit the shutter release, then walk to one side or the other of my camera and throw the light in from an angle, so it adds a little more dimension with shadows and highlights.

© Ken Hubbard

Sometimes other photographers’ light-painting adventures can work their way into your own photos. This image I took of one of the arches in Arches National Park was a happy accident. I was about 20 seconds into a 25-second exposure when someone who was sitting underneath the arch decided to blast it with light. I didn’t know it was going to happen, but it turned out to be a cool picture anyway.

© Ken Hubbard 

Before you start flashing lights everywhere, know the rules of the park you’re visiting.
Workshop leaders need permits no matter what to host groups in most national parks. The group that ran this year’s night sky workshops for us was National Park Trips Media, which took care of all of the logistics.

Some parks outright prohibit the light painting I mentioned earlier, especially from large groups. I can understand that: It can be annoying to individual photographers or nature-gazers in a park, trying to check out the night sky, only to have a bunch of people show up all at once and start blasting light everywhere. Individually, you often can light paint without a hassle, though check with your destination park before you go, as each has its own rules.

Seek out elements in your landscape to enhance your composition. 
Here’s where landscape photography during the day and at night doesn’t differ too much, because you always want some kind of landscape elements to create compelling visuals. That could entail some sort of silhouetted area or foreground visual—either a manmade one, like a building, or a natural one, like a rock formation. 

More often than not, I’ll try to keep those foreground elements in the lower third of the frame, as I’m using them mainly to enhance the night sky I’m trying to show off. And since I’m typically using a wide-angle lens in my night photography, I get up real close to whatever I’ve decided my subjects will be, as those elements will appear very small in a wide-angle photo otherwise. 

Tap into the leading lines of the landscape. 
I use natural lines to draw the viewer’s eye to where I want it to go. For instance, in my Milky Way photo taken in Zion, I positioned myself so the Milky Way descends straight down into the rock formation with the tree sticking out of it. 

© Ken Hubbard

I’ll also use the shape and structure of the landscape to either enhance the photo or mask issues that might be threatening to distract from what I’m trying to show. For instance, in my other photo here from Zion, I used the lights of the town of Springdale in the distance to silhouette the trees in that gap. And in my image of Balanced Rock taken in Arches National Park, the horizon was really lit up from Moab. To work around that, I stood in a spot so that when I took the photo, the Milky Way streamed down toward the horizon—making it appear as if the Milky Way was lighting up the horizon, not the neighboring city.

You can find more of Ken’s work here.

Focus Session: Macro Photography and First Look Bonus 24-70 with Tamron

Join Bergen County Camera and Tamron tech Armando Flores for our Saturday morning Focus Session on August 26th, all about Macro Photography. Armando will explore the world of the miniature as he addresses macro photography through correct exposure, white balance, lighting, composition, lens selection, and many more topics. This seminar, beginning at 9:30am, will show you how to use and select the right tools to master macro photography.

A little more about Armando Flores:

Armando studied photojournalism in college and has worked in the photo industry for over 30 years. He worked for Nikon, Sony and now Tamron. He photographed professional sports for more than 17 years and has also worked as a professional photographer for Reuters, AP, AMPAS, HFPA and IGLA. His interests are in sports, portraits, landscape and macro photography, but enjoys teaching just as much.                

Tamron will also be here to give everyone a first look of the new SP 24-70 VC G2 lens, including a bonus rebate for guests at the focus session. If purchased on the day of the event, there will be a bonus rebate of $50.00 on the new 24-70. Canon shooters can get in on this deal by preording and prepaying for the Canon mount SP 24-70 VC G2 lens. Read more about the new 24-70 2.8 Tamron lens here.

Tamron is also offering a one day bonus rebate of $25.00 on the new 18-400 VC lens, if purchased on 8/26/17.  Read more about the new 18-400 ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens here.

New Tamron 18-400 Di II VC HLD All-In-One

Introducing the world’s first ultra-telephoto 22.2X all-in-one zoom lens with extended range that covers 18-400mm. It’s amazing tele setting gives you a full-frame equivalent of 620mm for powerful close-up images. The new 18-400mm provides excellent image quality across the entire zoom range and is equipped with VC image stabilization, HLD AF system for quiet high-precision focusing. Photographers can now enjoy ultra-tele photography in a compact, easy to hold lens that provides the versatility only an all-in-one can offer. The ultra-telephoto range makes it the perfect lens to photograph animals and sports. Plus it’s ideal for travel photography and can be used to capture everything from stunning landscapes, neon-lit cities to portraits, and with the maximum magnification ratio of 1:2:9, you can even capture beautiful tele-macro images. The power of ultra-telephoto. The versatility of all-in-one. Stop by and give it a test drive!