Fly Fishing in Wyoming with the Tamron 70-200mm

Fly Fishing in Wyoming with the Tamron 70-200mm

Growing up in Colorado, and now a grad student at the University of Wyoming, Ben Kraushaar has spent his entire life immersed in the great outdoors. He’d always been interested in taking pictures while enjoying Mother Nature, but it wasn’t until 2012 when this casual hobby captured more of his attention.

“I’d decided to hike the Colorado Trail, a nearly 500-mile backpacking trip that starts in Denver and ends in Durango,” he says. “I wanted to document the journey, so I finally invested in a relatively decent camera. My goal was to fly-fish the whole trail and take photos the entire time. After that trip, I published an article about my experience in a fly-fishing magazine, and that was the catalyst for all of my future adventures.”

This summer Ben indulged both passions in Wyoming, where his girlfriend, Anna, was conducting fieldwork. To capture photos on this fly-fishing trip, he used the new Tamron SP 70-200mm VC G2 lens, which he says was invaluable for its focal-length range and Vibration Compensation (VC) technology. “With the 5-stop image stabilization on this lens, it made shooting handheld much easier—and I primarily shoot handheld when I’m fly-fishing,” he says. “It’s too much to haul a tripod into the backcountry. The VC proved especially helpful, as I generally have to use a really fast shutter speed to slow the bend of the rod down to freeze it. The best fly-fishing photos are also generally in lower light, so having that VC allows me to use that faster shutter speed in those lighting conditions to freeze the scene.”

Telling the story of a full day of fly-fishing means paying attention to every aspect of the sport. “It’s more of a lifestyle than an individual event, so there are plenty of things associated with it that can serve as subjects,” Ben notes. “Whether it’s photos of people camping, getting ready to fish, or the actual act of fishing, there’s plenty of versatility in terms of the tale you can tell. You also can’t neglect those amazing landscapes in front of your camera, or the close-up shots of the fish if you’re lucky enough to catch one.”

Ben typically heads out in the late afternoon or early evening for his fly-fishing adventures. “The best fishing is during those times, and that coincides with the best light,” he says. “I don’t mind shooting in midday if it’s overcast, but when it’s sunny, it’s hard to reduce all of the shadows. I shoot all natural light, mainly because carrying extra lighting equipment would be difficult. Since I’m also fly-fishing, I usually have my rod and other fishing gear, so I try to keep my photography equipment to a bare minimum.”

The 70-200 G2’s maximum F/2.8 aperture helps Ben set the scene as he wades, often knee-deep, into the water. “When I’m shooting a photo of someone casting a line, I try to use a low aperture like that F/2.8, especially when there’s a busy background,” he says. “Whether it’s trees or bushes, that low aperture helps blur out the background and isolate my subject. It also eliminates noise when I’m trying to get a silhouette of my subject against a blue sky or the water.” 

Ben’s biggest challenges when fly-fishing? Besides that less-than-ideal lighting during midday fishing expeditions, it would be the natural perils that come with the sport. “Sometimes the rivers are really slippery,” he says. “I have to do my best to try not to fall in and ruin my equipment.”

Which leads to the important matter of Ben keeping his gear protected. “I’ve yet to drop my camera in the water, but I have dropped five phones,” he laughs. “Sometimes I can tuck my camera in my waders a bit, so when I’m walking and splashing in the water, it’s not getting very wet, but the moisture-resistant build on this lens helps immensely on dreary, drizzly days. Sometimes my favorite photos come from when I’m out in the rain or snow, so having that water resistance is clutch and gives me the confidence that I’m not damaging my gear.”

Here, six of Ben’s images from his trip to the Cowboy State:

© Ben Kraushaar
200mm, F/2.8, 1/400th sec., ISO 400

This is a photo of my girlfriend, Anna. She’s a wildlife biologist. She always likes wearing colorful bandannas to keep the sun off her face and neck, and she’s shooting me a little glare here because I’m taking her picture. What’s nice about the 70-200 G2 is its capabilities as a portrait lens. With that F/2.8 aperture, you can achieve appealing bokeh and create some beautiful portraits.

© Ben Kraushaar
190mm, F/2.8, 1/400th sec., ISO 400

This photo of Anna catching a trout was taken on a river near Pinedale. It was evening, so the gold reflection on the water is from that last golden light in the sky. The river was mostly in the shadows, but the sun was really low, so I was able to capture all of those yellow-orange tones. 

I was standing up on a hillside for this shot. At that higher perspective, I was able to get nothing but water next to her in the frame. If I’d been positioned lower, I would’ve gotten the bank on the other side of the river, which would’ve taken away from the photo. I was at 190mm, so I was zoomed almost all the way in.

© Ben Kraushaar
200mm, F/2.8, 1/1600th sec., ISO 100

© Ben Kraushaar
70mm, F/2.8, 1/3200th sec., ISO 100

These next two photos show Anna casting a line, which means I had to try to freeze the action, as I discussed earlier. Usually, the line and the tip of the rod are moving really fast, so to freeze that and not get any blur of the line or rod, you have to shoot really fast. I usually end up shooting 1/1000th or faster for fly-fishing. Having that F/2.8 maximum aperture at 200mm allows me to get really tight and isolate my subject. 

© Ben Kraushaar
116mm, F/2.8, 1/640th sec., ISO 100

When you’re out on the river, there are an endless number of potential objects to shoot through and use as frames for your subjects. It’s really fun to play around with. In this case I blurred the greenery in the foreground a bit, which made an effective frame for Anna as she was wading away from me.

I also like the composition of this image (the whole walking-away narrative), because with fly-fishing, there’s a mysterious aspect to it. People will often post a picture of themselves fishing somewhere, and they won’t want to give their location away because it’s a sweet spot. So having just a hat in the photo, or someone looking away, adds to the whole secretive nature of the sport. 

© Ben Kraushaar
70mm, F/2.8, 1/2000th sec., ISO 100

We were at a lake near Dubois, Wyoming, and we came upon this scene with this one huge, random boulder. If you look around the rest of this area, it’s pretty clear of any sort of rocks, yet here we had this one beast. I wanted to take a landscape shot, but by putting a person into it, I was able to create a sense of scale. With this lens, you can zoom out to get a wider view or get the subject tighter in the scene by pulling the background in closer.

© Ben Kraushaar
200mm, F/2.8, 1/2000th sec., ISO 100

This is a photo of one of my girlfriend’s collaborators on her research project; she’s also really into fly-fishing. Here’s where she’s holding up the ultimate prize—a fish she caught. Sometimes you can spend over an hour trying to figure out what fly to tie on or what the fish are eating, so when you finally do catch a fish, it’s a very rewarding experience that proves you solved some sort of puzzle.

When that happens, the atmosphere changes from super-quiet peacefulness to animated excitement. I wanted to document that energy, and the emotions she was showing through her facial expressions, when she got to finally hold the results of all her hard efforts. By zooming in to 200mm, I was able to capture that moment.

To see more of Ben Kraushaar’s work, go to www.benjaminkraushaar.com

Shooting the Last Frontier with Vinit Mode and Two Tamron Lenses

Two Tamron lenses accompanied Vinit on his trip to the Last Frontier: the Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 VC and the SP 150-600mm VC G2. “I definitely wanted to have the 150-600 with me for taking pictures of wildlife,” he says. “And I found it useful for other logistical reasons. For example, when you’re in Denali National Park, you can’t take your private vehicle into much of it, so we were on a bus. Shooting through bus glass can be tricky, but my handheld pictures of the snowcapped mountains through the windows came out amazing.”

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Lakota Wolf Preserve Trip : October 8th

Out most popular trip is coming around again.

Join Bergen County Camera and Tamron on October 8th, 2017 as we return to the Lakota Wolf Preserve.

At Lakota Wolf Preserve, you will be greeted with numerous opportunities to get unobstructed pictures of the wolves in their natural settings. Since you will be photographing the wolves where they live, in a stress free environment, you will get the best possible photo opportunities. Come as close as 3-4 feet to the wolves during our private photography session.  We will end our morning at the Brook Hollow Winery for a wrap up session and complimentary wine tasting.

There will be a pre-trip evening lecture on Wildlife Photography at Lakota Wolf in our Westwood store, on October 5th 2017 from 7-8pm. The lecture will cover the layout and rules of Lakota, what to expect, what lenses are best suited, and how to get that great shot! The lecture will be presented by Tamron.

 

This trip is limited to 30 people so be sure to reserve early.

Tickets can be purchased below.

 

Eventbrite - Bergen County Camera Trips and Meetups 2017

New Tamron 18-400 Di II VC HLD All-In-One

Introducing the world’s first ultra-telephoto 22.2X all-in-one zoom lens with extended range that covers 18-400mm. It’s amazing tele setting gives you a full-frame equivalent of 620mm for powerful close-up images. The new 18-400mm provides excellent image quality across the entire zoom range and is equipped with VC image stabilization, HLD AF system for quiet high-precision focusing. Photographers can now enjoy ultra-tele photography in a compact, easy to hold lens that provides the versatility only an all-in-one can offer. The ultra-telephoto range makes it the perfect lens to photograph animals and sports. Plus it’s ideal for travel photography and can be used to capture everything from stunning landscapes, neon-lit cities to portraits, and with the maximum magnification ratio of 1:2:9, you can even capture beautiful tele-macro images. The power of ultra-telephoto. The versatility of all-in-one. Stop by and give it a test drive! 

 

Tamron Keep on Clicking Tour Stops Here April 29th

Registration is closed for this sold out event

We hope you can join us for this free event on Saturday April 29th. This event has a demo day from 11 am – 3 pm with the Tamron Tech Team and a Free Educational lecture from 6 pm – 7:30 pm. Topics for the educational lecture include travel, landscape and nature photography produced exclusively with Tamron lenses. Advanced  registration required to attend this Free event.  The full event details are shown below. Please let us know if you have any questions via email or the comment form below.

Coming Soon – Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 for Canon and Nikon

January 22, 2015, Commack, New York– Tamron, a leading manufacturer of precision optics, announces the release of a groundbreaking F/2.8 ultra-wide-angle zoom lens for full-frame DSLR cameras. The Tamron SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (model A012) is the only zoom lens in its category to feature image stabilization. The lens will be available starting January 30, 2015 at $1199.99. 

Since 2012, Tamron has been expanding its lineup of interchangeable lenses for full-frame DSLR cameras. The Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A007) was the world’s first F/2.8 high-speed standard zoom lens to include image stabilization, followed by the development of the unique SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A009), SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD (Model F004), and SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A011) lenses, all of which have been highly acclaimed among the photo enthusiasts around the globe. Now, we have developed SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012) to expand the world of imaging possibilities in the wide-angle range.

* For F/2.8 ultra-wide-angle zoom lens for full-frame DSLR cameras (As of January 22,2015. Source: Tamron)

 


Product Highlights

 

1. Superior, class leading imaging performance using an innovative XGM lens element

With an optical construction consisting of 18 elements in 13 groups, including, for the first time, an XGM (eXpanded Glass Molded Aspherical) lens element placed in the front group, and several Molded-Glass Aspherical elements and LD (Low Dispersion) elements used throughout the optical system, aberrations such as geometrical distortion and lateral color are efficiently corrected enabling the zoom lens to deliver outstanding image quality throughout its entire zoom range from corner to corner.

 

2. Enhanced sharpness with exclusive VC image stabilization when shooting handheld in low light or at night

In response to popular demand, Tamron has created the world’s first F/2.8 ultra-wide-angle zoom lens with VC (Vibration Compensation)*4. The VC allows shooting at slow shutter speeds and in low light conditions, and effectively compensates for minor camera shake, whilst maintaining class leading optimal performance.

 

3. eBAND Coating provides superior anti-reflection properties

In addition to further optimizing Tamron’s acclaimed BBAR (Broad-Band Anti-Reflection) Coating, the eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating has also been employed in this lens. This combination offers superior anti-reflection properties especially important in ultra-wide-angle lenses which are particularly susceptible to flare and ghosting due to their wide angle of view, and provides superior quality and crystal-clear images by minimizing unwanted light reaching the sensor.

 

4. 15-30mm zoom covers both ultra-wide and semi-wide-angle focal lengths

At its ultra-wide-angle settings this lens can capture, in a single photograph, broad landscapes that cannot be taken in fully by the human eye. At its semi-wide-angle focal lengths, it’s ideal for travel and street photography. In short, this unique lens utilizes the zoom function to provide maximum shooting flexibility with a wide range of subjects.

 

5. Fascinating background “bokeh” throughout the wide-angle range due to its fast constant F/2.8 aperture

Utilizing its shallow depth of field at F/2.8, it enables users to capture beautiful bokeh effects even at wide coverage angles. Its advanced optical formula and 9-bladed circular diaphragm are designed with defocused photography in mind – perfect for creating images where subjects stand out from their natural, blended backgrounds.

 

6. Proven fluorine coating utilizing Tamron’s industrial lens expertise is used on the front element

Fluorine coating, with an established track record in Tamron’s industrial lenses, such as those used in automotive cameras, has been applied to the front element. It repels water and dirt, and makes it easier to remove smudges.

 

7. Flexible, high-performance focusing with USD

USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive)*5 delivers high torque, high precision, and virtually silent autofocus action. A full-time manual focus mechanism permits fine focus adjustments instantly without needing to exit AF mode.

 

8. Lens hood designed to prevent light from striking lens at all focal lengths

This unique lens hood provides effective shading of the front lens surface over the entire zoom range to minimize flare. It utilizes the unique characteristics of the optical system in which the front lens group recedes as you zoom in from 15 mm to 30 mm.

 

9. Double-hood structure provides additional strength

A double-hood structure has been incorporated into the lens design to improve the durability of the zoom mechanism.

 

10. Comes with “SILKYPIX Developer Studio for Tamron”, RAW image processing software customized for Tamron SP lenses

The SILKYPIX Developer Studio software can develop high-quality images from RAW data, incorporating adjustments that can express the personal style and taste of the photographer. These include white balance, color, sharpness, and the tonal curves recorded by digital cameras.

 

The SILKYPIX Developer Studio for Tamron provides a range of functions in addition to the basic adjustment capabilities, such as correcting aberrations (chromatic aberrations, distortion, peripheral light fall-off), based on the optical data. Used in tandem with Tamron’s SP series lenses – renowned for their crisp, high-resolution imaging – this advanced technology efficiently produces images that meet photographers’ most exacting demands.

1 The XGM (eXpanded Glass Molded Aspherical) lens element is capable of efficiently correcting aberrations in the angle of view that changes significantly with an ultra-wideangle zoom lens. Furthermore, it has an especially significant impact on minimizing distortion and enhancing sharpness of the image at its periphery.2 eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating is a new nanotechnology-based coating technique developed by Tamron to reduce unwanted reflections.

3 The Sony mount version does not include VC since Sony digital SLR bodies incorporate built-in image stabilization functionality. The name of the Sony mount model is “SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di USD” without the VC designation.

4 VC (Vibration Compensation) is Tamron’s proprietary image stabilization mechanism.

5 USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) is Tamron’s proprietary ring-type ultrasonic motor.

 

 

Specifications

 

 


* Length is the distance from the front tip of the lens to the lens mount face.

**Length and weight are based on figures for the Canon-mount and the Nikon-mount lens.

*6 The circular diaphragm stays almost perfectly circular up to two stops down from maximum aperture.

 

Specifications, appearance, functionality, etc. are subject to change without prior notice

Detailed Feature Specifications


* VC (Vibration Compensation)

VC is Tamron’s proprietary image stabilization system. Tamron’s VC employs a three-coil system, whereby three driving coils activate the shake-compensating VC lens group electromagnetically via three ceramic ball bearings. The VC lens elements are held in place only by contact with the ceramic ball bearings, achieving smooth movement with little friction. And since the VC mechanism is moved in parallel using only the motorized control, the mechanical structure has been simplified, enabling the development of more compact lenses.

 

*The Ultrasonic Motor
In the ultrasonic motor, a piezoelectric element arranged in a ring formation generates ultrasonic vibrations in a metallic ring stator, and this vibration energy is used to rotate a metallic ring rotor that is attached to the stator. The rotation energy is in turn transferred from the metallic ring rotor to operate the focusing mechanism of the lens.

 

* eBAND (Extended Bandwidth & Angular-Dependency) Coating

eBAND Coating, developed by Tamron, is a new coating technique that radically improves anti-reflection properties. A nano-structured layer (1nm = 1/1,000,000mm), with dimensions smaller than the wavelengths of visible rays of light, is deployed on top of multiple coating layers to maximize light transmission efficiency.

Reflections occur at the interface between the lens and the air because of the difference in refractive indices of the two substances. The nano-structure of the eBAND Coating makes possible an extremely low refractive index by minimizing the differential with that of air while actively inducing air to its own structure, thus significantly suppressing the extent and degree of reflections.

 

In addition, the total anti-reflection efficiency at the lens surface is further improved by means of integrating the conventional coating technique based on an active utilization of the “interference of light” principle, attenuating the level of reflections by overlaying reflected light on the coating front surface and that of the back side with its phase shifted, thus increasing the net transmissivity.

 

As a hybrid technology that integrates the newly developed nano-structured layer with an extremely low refractive index and conventional multiple-layer coatings, the eBAND Coating provides superb anti-reflection performance, delivering crisp, razor sharp images, and eliminating the flare and ghosting that can tangibly damage image quality to a remarkable degree.

About Tamron“New Eyes for Industry” is Tamron’s philosophy. This creed is consistent with the company’s position as a comprehensive manufacturer of a wide range of original optical products, from interchangeable lenses for SLR cameras to various optical devices for both the general consumer and OEM. Tamron makes optical products that contribute to a range of different industries and will continue to devote its rich creativity and leading-edge technical prowess to various industrial fields. Furthermore, Tamron is fully aware of its responsibility to the environment and aspires to help preserve the natural environment in all of its business activities. Among its many optical and mechanical innovations since the founding of the company in 1950, Tamron’s development of mass-produced hybrid Aspherical elements paved the way for today’s compact high power All-In-One™ lenses when, in 1992, this technology was incorporated into the ground-breaking 28-200mm. Tamron continues to lead in this category of lenses with the 18-270mm Di II VC PZD – the world’s smallest and lightest 15X All-In-One™ zoom lens featuring Tamron’s proprietary VC (Vibration Compensation) system for blur-free hand-held shooting of photos in low light and at telephoto settings and PZD (Piezo Drive) autofocus system for fast and quiet autofocus operation. Tamron’s recent SP (Super performance) lens introductions have received accolades and high praise from leading photographic magazines and websites for their outstanding best-in-class performance. Tamron has garnered international acclaim for its extensive line-up of professional and consumer lenses. 

Optical Product Line-up:

Interchangeable lenses for SLR cameras, digital camera lenses, video camera lenses, lenses for automotive applications, CCTV and IP lenses, lenses for long wavelength infrared cameras, ultra-precision optical components and more.

Stop in and check out Tamron’s Low Aperture Lenses

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Low aperture zoom lenses are ideal for anyone looking to improve the quality of their images. If you’re shooting high action in a low light situation or trying to achieve a unique look with a smaller depth of focus, these lenses are ideal for you. Both the Tamron 24-70 f/2.8 and Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 lenses are stabilized and cost hundreds of dollars less then the Nikon or Canon versions. Stop in to check out these Tamron lenses and more at Bergen County Camera.

Tamron Mail in Rebates Arrive Just in Time for Valentine’s Day

Looking for a lens for your DSLR that will make your life easier. Stop in and check out the Tamron 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3. This all in one lens eliminates the need to carry multiple lenses. No need to swap lenses, whether you’re looking to take a photo of your family in your living room or the bird in the tree across the street. This lens now carries a $50 mail in rebate. Looking for a solid dedicated zoom lens? The Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 now features a $100 mail in rebate. This lens is perfect whether you own a full frame or crop sensor camera. Plus as a stabilized zoom lens, you’ll get clearer images with slower shutter speeds then non stabilized lenses. These mail in rebates are valid until March 31st 2014.

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