Solar Eclipse – August 21st

The next total solar eclipse will occur on August 21st 2017. The path of totality is scheduled to be seen from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Those who are located outside of this path of totality will be able to see portions of the eclipse, in a partial eclipse, with the moon covering a section of the sun’s disk. 

Path of totality, courtesy of NASA

Though New Jersey is not within the zone of totality, we are still located within the zone for a partial eclipse. At the height of the eclipse here, we should see the sun covered approximately 73%. The best time to look out for the eclipse in New Jersey is going to be around 2:45 pm. 

Regardless of a partial eclipse or not, it is extremely important to use eye protection when viewing the eclipse. Looking at the sun at anytime can damage your eyes, especially during an eclipse. Special glasses are produced for the solar eclipse, and should be ISO certified to ensure your safety when viewing this special sight. These glasses are available for free within our store while supplies last. The only time it is safe to view the sun without glasses is at totality, when the moon completely covers the sun’s disk (this will not occur in New Jersey).

 

Some Tips to Help Photograph the Solar Eclipse

  • Use a telephoto/zoom lens and a tele-converter
  • Never look at the sun through your camera’s lens without proper eye protection
  • Use a solar filter for safe viewing at all times UNLESS the eclipse is at totality
  • You want a focal length under 2000mm on a full frame camera, or 1300mm on a crop sensor (this is to ensure you get the entire sun within your shot)
  • Get a sturdy tripod, and manually focus the camera to infinity
  • Practice, take a ‘test’ shot on a day before the eclipse, shoot various shutter speeds with a fixed aperture (between f/8 and f/16), and look for optimal exposures

More tips can be found online, like on Nikon’s website here

Adobe Camera Raw 9.12 now available

For the full story take a look at the Adobe blog post explaining all the latest camera and lens profiles updates / supported. Adobe recommends that you use the update mechanism inside Photoshop – “Help -> Updates”
For Creative Cloud users this download should automatically become available.

Here’s the list of changes to existing camera support (referenced in Adobe’s blog post).

Camera Raw 9.12  add support for the following cameras

  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Canon EOS 200D(EOS Kiss X9, EOS Rebel SL2)
  • Leica TL2
  • Nikon D7500
  • Olympus Tough TG-5

15 new lens profiles have been added.

Customer Spotlight – Joseph DiCara

Welcome to our fifth Bergen County Camera Customer Spotlight. This monthly posting features a customer who’s made an impression on us. They might have grown in their understanding of photography, gained a mastery of the craft and / or have become a strong advocate of our way of doing business in the world of photography. During the next month you will see this customer’s images displayed on our digital signs in store, in our emails, blog posts and social media. We hope you both enjoy and are inspired by this new addition to In Focus and look forward to your comments and suggestions. 

Joseph DiCara  is this month’s customer profile. Please enjoy a few of Joseph DiCara’s images in the gallery below.

A word from Joseph DiCara:

I have always had a passion for photography. Fascinated how a single captured second in time can convey such strong and diverse feelings. As an Architect I also strive to create environments that also evoke emotions by everyone that experiences my designs.

A sense of texture, lighting, scale, proportion, composition and yes …surprise… are necessary in creating memorable photography and enduring Architecture.

The ability to create something that others can feel and experience is a skill that must be continually nurtured.

Our friends at BCC do just that. They help us, educate us, critique us, and push us in a fun enjoyable environment.

I have seen wonderful examples of diverse photography ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​and improvement in everyone in the group. I know that Paul has pushed me in my photography to always improve, try new things outside my comfort level and strive to be better.

 

Explore, create, fail, yes fail, but never give up.

Remember

“…good enough never is…”

Joseph DiCara

View Joseph DiCara’s photos below:

Where to Photograph Fireworks – Locations and Tips 2017

North Jersey’s parade, fireworks and celebration map

List of North Jersey fireworks, times and dates

Here are some basic starting points

Please let us know if you get some great shots we’d love to see!
Please feel free to leave your comments and suggestions. Have a great 4th of July Holiday weekend from all of us at BCC.

Find a fireworks display on NJ.com‘s 4th of July celebrations page.

  • Use a tripod
  • Electronic release, 2 second self timer to eliminate shake or by carefully pressing the shutter button to minimize shake.
  • Manually set your camera ISO to 100 (You do not want Auto ISO)
  • Lens Choice – Wide Angle Zoom to frame what you’d like to capture
  • Auto White Balance or Daylight
  • Set your lens to manual focus then focus to infinity (take a test image and make sure things are sharp) Don’t forget to switch back to auto focus when done shooting
  • Method 1 – Set your camera to Manual exposure – Try 5 seconds at f/8 – 16 – this will allow you to capture several bursts
  • Method 2 – Try setting you camera to the “B” setting in manual – keep the shutter depressed at f/ 8 – 16 for several bursts
  • Carefully release the shutter if not using a release to capture from one to several bursts

**Evaluate your exposure – Shorter exposures (or smaller apertures ) will darken the image and capture shorter trails, Longer exposures (or larger apertures ) will lighten the image and capture longer trails.** If necessary make adjustments and take some more shots

If you are using a point a shoot, check your camera’s manual to see if you have a fireworks mode.

Improving Fireworks photos

Shoot with a tripod – it will give a more natural cascade of light.

Shooting the Finale!

The finale is many times brighter than rest of the show. Be ready to choose a shorter exposure or smaller aperture to prevent overexposure. The exposure you need is dependent on the number of simultaneous bursts. In some really incredible finales you may find yourself shooting at 1/4 or 1/8th of a second. Experiment for best results.

Why use a tripod?

Hand-held image above shows motion from camera shake in the burst of light.

The image below is steadied by a tripod, 5 seconds, f/16 at 100 ISO

Other Techniques

Set your camera to B and lock open your shutter – keep the lens covered with a dark hat and remove the hat to capture a burst then recover and repeat to capture several bursts. Just be careful not to bump your camera.
You can even zoom the lens during exposure for some interesting effects

Experiment and best of all have fun.

Happy Independence Day!